Career Salary Overview

Health Services Manager $90K
Healthcare Executives $110K
Healthcare Finances $110K
Hospital HR Manager $100K
40K60K80K100K120K

What can I do with a master's in health administration?

Health administrators are often cited as the policy makers and managers of the healthcare world. They are in positions that ensure healthcare facilities – e.g. hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation centers, nonprofit organizations – run smoothly and provide high quality services. They take on roles usually associated with those who hold business or public administration degrees, but their training has them firmly rooted in healthcare fields.

Obtaining an MHA degree will give you:

  • An understanding of the procedures and services provided by healthcare professionals.
  • Insight into how medical facilities are operated.
  • The business skills necessary to analyze and balance budgets, manage human resources, run special projects and improve staff morale and performance.
  • The ability to communicate with staff, patients, boards of trustees, volunteers, peers and outside vendors about the needs and duties of an organization.
  • Knowledge of legal and ethical issues that can and do arise within healthcare settings and how to deal with and approach those concerns with care and dignity.

What careers can I pursue after earning my MHA?

Master’s of Health Administration degree holders fill many roles one would expect to find in corporate firms, including work in executive, HR and financial roles. Many of the concentrations for the degree focus on the business side of healthcare.


Health Services Manager

Healthcare and Medical services managers are most often found working for hospitals, nursing homes or rehabilitation centers, but they may also find work with public health organizations that provide medical aid. These managers are in charge of ensuring that healthcare facilities are organized and run smoothly; they usually report directly to the governing board or executive managers.


$88,580 Average Salary

Major Responsibilities

  • Remain informed of current healthcare laws and regulations that could affect how health facilities are run and organized
  • Organize and manage records, including employee, patient and facility notes
  • Perform human resource duties, including setting the weekly schedules, acting as mediator in disputes and liaising between the health facility and the governing board
  • Keep everyone employed by the facility up-to-date on changes in policy and procedure
  • Create ways to improve the quality and efficiency of services provided

Salary and Employment Expectations

Best Paying States

  1. Washington D.C.$131,160
  2. California$122,410
  3. New York$121,930
  4. Connecticut$117,680
  5. New Jersey$115,370

Job Numbers by State

  1. California28,980
  2. New York27,840
  3. Texas19,460
  4. Ohio15,750
  5. Illinois13,730

Work Environment

  • Hospitals
  • Nursing homes
  • Assisted living facilities
  • Group practices
  • Public health organizations

Education Required

Entry-level positions in this field require a bachelor's degree, though it is recommended that those who want to hold higher management positions should obtain a master's-level education.

Specializations and Certifications

Administrators working in nursing homes or assisted living facilities are required by all states to be certified. Credentialing requirements vary by state. The American College of Health Care Administrators (ACHCA) offers two certifications: Certified Nursing Home Administrators and Certified Assisted Living Administrators.

Career Path

Individuals pursuing a career in medical and healthcare services management are not required to have previous work experience in the field, and a bachelor's degree in health administration often suffices to be hired. However, furthering your education by obtaining an MHA and becoming certified, as well as gaining on-the-job experience, may qualify you for positions within health facilities that give you more responsibilities and higher pay.


Healthcare Executives

Healthcare executives, like their business counterparts, are charged with the running of the business side of medical facilities. They report directly to a board of directors or investors, and they work with their teams of managers to create policies and implement programs that benefit the company and the efficiency with which it’s run. The number of top executives and their responsibilities depend on size and needs of an organization. At smaller hospitals, for instance, the head manager could take on the responsibilities usually attributed to chief financial, information and operating officers. Conversely, larger healthcare facilities usually have one person fill each role.


$101,650 Average Salary

Major Responsibilities

  • Oversee the management, policy creation and “bigger picture” aspects of a company
  • Ensure deadlines are met and goals reached through the organization of teams
  • Share progress reports for projects with governing boards and investors
  • Secure funding for various departments within a company
  • Manage and work with a diverse group of employees

Salary and Employment Expectations

Best Paying States

  1. Connecticut$216,990
  2. North Carolina$212,030
  3. Rhode Island$207,910
  4. New York$205,560
  5. Nebraska$203,740

Job Numbers by State

  1. California31,360
  2. Illinois23,460
  3. New York18,570
  4. Florida13,080
  5. Pennsylvania11,190

Work Environment

  • Hospitals
  • Health Maintenance Organizations
  • Community Health Centers

Education Required

A bachelor's degree is required for most entry-level positions.

Specializations and Certifications

Certification is not mandatory, but those who wish to advance to a top executive role within the medical field may want to obtain the Certified Medical Manager (CMM) credentials.

Career Path

The base-level of education required to become a top executive is directly related to work experience. In some instances, it's possible to move into the higher management positions with a bachelor's degree and years of working in the same field. In other cases, you may be able to bypass work experience by pursuing a higher degree in your field.


Healthcare Finances

Financial managers work with other managers and top executives to ensure that investors’ funds and company income is used in a way that will help the business meet its financial goals. Within the healthcare field, financial managers must have an understanding of medical billing and insurance claims and adjustments. They may also be called upon to design a budget that will allow different departments to purchase new machines and technology that will improve the healthcare services provided.


$109,740 Average Salary

Major Responsibilities

  • Create reports outlining an organization’s income, expenses and losses
  • Monitor the use of supplies to ensure there is no overspending or unnecessary waste
  • Work with other departments or top executives to create a budget and implement plans that will maximize profit or lower overhead costs
  • Train employees and managers on budget plans and help them stay on track
  • Provide investment advice and assist in filing the hospital’s taxes

Salary and Employment Expectations

Best Paying States

  1. New York$175,020
  2. Delaware$156,640
  3. New Jersey$154,130
  4. Colorado$146,320
  5. California$144,670

Job Numbers by State

  1. California73,700
  2. New York37,940
  3. Illinois30,360
  4. Texas27,690
  5. Massachussetts23,310

Work Environment

  • Hospitals
  • Nursing homes
  • Assisted living facilities
  • Group practices
  • Public health organizations

Education Required

Financial managers can find employment with a bachelor's degree, but those interested in working in the healthcare field can better their chances by earning a health administration degree.

Career Path

Most employment opportunities for financial managers require individuals to have at least five years of experience working in the field. For those who wish to work in the healthcare profession, it is a good idea to take courses to familiarize yourself with finances as they relate to medicine and health. For those currently working in finance, earning an MHA will give them the healthcare grounding they need to be top managers.


Hospital HR Managers

Human resource managers are in charge of the employees. They often have the responsibility of hiring and firing, and they mediate disputes that may arise. The HR department acts as the liaison between the employees and upper management, and they work with other managers to find ways to keep the employees motivated to reach goals. Human resource managers in hospitals need to understand the pressures the staff are under and how to best help them cope. They also need to know what makes a good healthcare provider to help with the recruitment process.


$99,720 Average Salary

Major Responsibilities

  • Evaluate current employees, and interview job applicants, to build a team that works well together to meet an organization’s goals
  • Inform employees and managers on upper management’s decisions regarding changes to company policies and practices
  • Act as mediator in disagreements and oversee disciplinary meetings
  • Ensure all employees are aware of the code of conduct and policies on sexual harassment, dress, etc.

Salary and Employment Expectations

Best Paying States

  1. New Jersey$144,280
  2. Washington D.C.$140,070
  3. Delaware$136,250
  4. New York$135,370
  5. Colorado$133,740

Job Numbers by State

  1. California15,300
  2. New York9,510
  3. Illinois6,780
  4. Texas6,640
  5. Ohio4,230

Work Environment

  • Hospitals
  • Nursing homes
  • Assisted living facilities
  • Group practices
  • Public health organizations

Education Required

Entry-level positions can be obtained with a bachelor's degree, but those who aspire to more responsibilities or work within the medical field will benefit from obtaining an MHA.

Specializations and Certifications

Certification is not required to find employment as an HR manager, but earning the credentials offered by the Human Resources Certification Institute would illustrate a dedication to the field.

Career Path

Human resource managers need at least five years of experience working on HR teams, with financial departments or as team leaders. Entry-level positions can be found for those who hold bachelor's degrees, but applicants with more experience and education, particularly those who want to work for a healthcare facility, will have better luck of advancing in their careers.